Sourcebooks

Sourcebooks are produced by MOA staff, students, volunteers, visiting scholars, and community members to reflect their research and personal interests. Each sourcebook focuses on an object, artist, or area of cultural significance, and serves as an important introduction to the work of the Museum and its community partners. Accompanied by text, images, and useful references, these books are invaluable resources for the classroom and the casual reader alike.

Mary Anne Barkhouse

This sourcebook is about the life and selected works of Kwakwaka'wakw artist Mary Anne Barkhouse.

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Peter Morin's Museum

Peter Morin’s Museum is an idea in practice—and how to physically represent the structures that support the idea.

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Claiming Space

This is the sourcebook for the exhibition 'Claiming Space: Voices of Urban Aboriginal Youth at the UBC Museum of Anthropology.' Check out original work by over 28 young urban aboriginal artists ages 15-25, from across Canada, the United States, Norway and New Zealand.

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The Raven and the First Men

Bill Reid’s monumental sculpture, The Raven and the First Men, began as a miniature boxwood carving inspired by the works of 19th-century Haida carver Charles Edenshaw.

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The Honour of One is the Honour of All

This Sourcebook is a tribute to the First Nations men and women recognized by UBC for their distinguished achievements and outstanding service to either the life of the university, the province, or on a national or international level.

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We Are the Wuikinuxv Nation

This Sourcebook gives you a glimpse of the people of the Wuikinuxv Nation through historical Wuikinuxv artwork, archival photographs, contemporary perspectives and photographs.

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Mehodihi: Well-Known Traditions of Tahltan People

This Sourcebook grew out of the exhibit Mehodihi: Well-Known Traditions of Tahltan People, “Our Great Ancestors Lived That Way” which opened on October 18, 2003 at MOA.

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A Piece of Me

This Sourcebook explores the diverse ways that personal identity and transformation are expressed by urban aboriginal youth.

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