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Research & Collections Stories

Teacher Resources

Returning The Past: Repatriation of First Nations Cultural Property

This resource provides a unit of study on First Nations repatriations for secondary school students.

Resource of English Second Language Teachers and Students

These materials are designed to prepare teachers and ESL students for a self-guided group visit to the Museum.

Background Information: First Nations of BC

An introduction to MOA and First Nations peoples, nations and territories, the potlatch, technology and artistry, understanding totem poles, glossary of terms related to school programs and more.

First Nations Map

The intent of this map is to provide a more accurate representation of First Nations in British Columbia.


Voices Of The Canoe

Learn about the canoe traditions of the Fijian, Squamish and Haida people and understand the historical and ongoing importance of canoe culture for these Indigenous peoples. The site features interviews from Indigenous artists, canoe makers and others to encourage students to consider multiple points of view, and to question what is historically significant and what evidence is used to determine historical significance. It also hosts a range of evidence – photographs, maps, interviews, historical texts and short films. This website was developed by MOA in conjunction with The History Education Network/Histoire et Education en Reseau.

One Mind, One Heart

Learn more about the fierce opposition by the Heiltsuk Nation to the proposed Enbridge Northern Gateway pipeline and oil-tanker traffic in their ancestral waters. The site features films, photos of Heiltsuk territory, and community protests during the Project Review Panel’s visit to Bella Bella. The MOA installation (in Multiversity Galleries, Exhibit Case 23) shows the ancestral guardian of the undersea world, ’Yágis, swallowing an oil tanker trespassing in Heiltsuk waters. ’Yágis, the mask was created by Heiltsuk artist ’Nusí to invoke ancient Heiltsuk teachings and the law of Káxláya Gvi’ílás in order to protect their land and seas for the future.